Latest Travel News from APH

Do I need to tell the DVLA about my medical condition? Find out if you should still be driving here

From a broken bone to deafness and suffering a heart attack – do drivers need to tell the DVLA? Find out if these and other health issues need to be disclosed and if they could result in having your licence revoked…

Failure to declare a condition could lead to a £1,000 fine and prosecution if involved in an accident.

Failure to declare a medical condition could end up in court: credit: West Midlands Police

The information on this page applies only to car and motorbike drivers/riders. The rules for bus, coach, or lorry licences are different. Please consult a doctor.

Here we look at a selection of conditions and whether you’re required to declare them. The full list can be found here .


Condition: Alcohol problems

Need to declare? Yes. If you suffer from any alcohol-related problems you must tell the DVLA.

How to declare: Use form DR1 here if you’re a car or motorcycle driver.


Condition: Absence seizures

Need to declare? Yes, you are required to let the DVLA know about any epileptic attacks, seizures, fits or blackouts. It’s likely your licence will be taken away and when you can apply to get it back will depend on the type of seizure you suffered. Find details on when you can re-apply here.

How to declare: Use form FEP1 here if you’re a car or motorcycle driver.


Condition: Angina

Need to declare? No. You won’t need to tell the DVLA about your angina – even if you’re using medication. However, if you suffer attacks while resting, driving or due to emotion, you must stop driving until the symptoms are under control. You can find out more about driving with heart conditions here.

How to declare: N/A


Condition: Angioplasty

Need to declare? No. You won’t need to tell the DVLA after you’ve had a heart, cardiac or coronary angioplasty. However, you will need to stop driving for a week after the procedure and follow instructions from your doctor as to when it’s safe to start again. You can find out more about driving with heart conditions here.

How to declare: N/A


KEEP YOUR DRIVING LICENCE UP TO DATE AND LEGAL HERE

Condition: Anxiety

Need to declare? Yes – if your anxiety affects your driving you will need to fill in a questionnaire and send to the DVLA for assessment.

How to declare: Download and fill out the M1V questionnaire here.


Condition: Arthritis

Need to declare? If the condition means you need to use special controls, then you will need to contact the DVLA. In addition, the DVLA advise sufferers to speak to their GP if unsure about how the condition will affect their ability to drive.

How to declare: Let the DVLA know about what modifications and special controls you use by filling out the G1 form that you can download here


Condition: Blood pressure problems / high blood pressure

Need to declare? You will need to tell the DVLA about your condition if your blood pressure treatment has side-effects that impact on your driving. This could be anything from dizziness to feeling faint. However, you will not need to report high blood pressure to the DVLA in isolation if your medication is not causing any side-effects.

How to declare: If suffering from side-effects from treatment, fill out the BP1 form.


Condition: Broken limbs

Need to declare? Yes – but only if the broken leg, arm etc means you won’t be able to drive for more than three months. Many people don’t realise this is the case, which could potentially leave them open to a £1,000 fine.

How to declare: Download form G1 to inform the DVLA of your broken limb.


Condition: Cancer

Need to declare? As a rule you don’t need to inform the DVLA about cancer, but you will need to contact them in the following circumstances (ask your doctor for more advice if unsure):

You develop problems with your brain or nervous system

Your doctor says you might not be fit to drive

You are restricted to certain types of vehicles, or vehicles that have been adapted for your condition.

Your medication could affect your driving

How to declare: Download form G1 to inform the DVLA.


Condition: Cardiac problems

Need to declare? No – you don’t need to tell the DVLA about heart problems. However, you should consult your doctor and only restart driving when he/she says it’s safe for you to do so.

How to declare: Read the DVLA’s information guide to driving with heart conditions here.


Condition: Caesarean section

Need to declare? Yes – but only if you’re still unable to drive three months after the surgery. The doctor will advise at the time as to how long it’s likely to be before it’s safe to drive.

How to declare: Contact the DVLA for more information.


Condition: Cataracts

Need to declare? No need to tell the DVLA about cataracts in just one eye providing you don’t have a condition in the other – in which case you will need to contact the authority. Additionally, you must inform the DVLA if you have cataracts in both eyes. If you want to resume driving after surgery, you will need to meet the standard visual requirements for drivers. These can be found here.

How to declare: You can now report your eye condition directly only here. If you would like to do it by post, the V1 form can be downloaded here.


Condition: Coronary bypass (heart bypass) surgery

Need to declare? No – no need to tell the DVLA, but you should stop driving for at least one month and only resume when your doctor says it is safe to do so.

How to declare:  Read the DVLA’s information guide to driving with heart conditions here.


Condition: Deafness

Need to declare? No – there is no requirement to inform the DVLA of hearing loss.

How to declare:  N/A


Condition: Depression

Need to declare? Yes – if your condition or medication affects your driving. Speak to your doctor about this as it might not be clear to the sufferer.

How to declare:  Use the M1 questionnaire here.


Condition: Diabetes

Need to declare? Depending on the type of medicine or treatment you’re receiving. Speak to your doctor to see how this might impact on your driving and if you should contact the DVLA.

How to declare:  Fill out DIAB1 here.


Condition: Drugs – misuse of 

Need to declare? Yes. If you have used any illegal drugs or misused prescription medicines, you are required to inform the DVLA.

How to declare:  Fill out DG1.


ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE LATEST DRUG DRIVING LAWS – ILLEGAL AND PRESCRIPTION

Condition: Eating disorders

Need to declare? Yes – if the disorder (such as anorexia nervosa) is likely to affect your ability to drive safely. See a doctor to help make this decision.

How to declare:  You will need to fill out form M1 if applicable.


Condition: Glaucoma

Need to declare? If this eye condition only affects one eye there’s no need to report if your other eye has normal vision. However, you must inform the DVLA if you have a medical condition in the other eye, or can’t meet the visual standards required for driving.

If you have glaucoma in both eyes you will be required to report your condition to the DVLA.

How to declare:  If you have glaucoma in one eye and need to report it due to another condition in the other eye or being unable to meet eyesight requirements for driving, fill out form V1 here. Anyone with glaucoma in both eyes must report if using the V1 form or declare it online here.


Condition: Heart attack

Need to declare? No. However, you must stop driving for at least one month and only resume when a doctor says it’s safe to do so.

How to declare:  Read the DVLA’s information guide to driving with heart conditions here.


Condition: Heart palpitations

Need to declare? Yes – you must report this condition to the DVLA. Heart palpitations may feel like fluttering or pounding beats in your chest, throat or neck and typically last just a few seconds. Most are harmless but you should consult your doctor.

How to declare:  Fill out the H1 form here.


Condition: High blood pressure

Need to declare? No. You do not need to report this condition – unless you have side-effects from treatment that affects your driving.

How to declare:  N/A


Condition: HIV

Need to declare? No. You do not need to report this condition.

How to declare:  N/A


Condition: Kidney problems

Need to declare? No. You do not need to report this condition. However, after dialysis, you must ask the doctor if it’s safe to drive.

How to declare:  N/A


Condition: Mini-stroke (Transient ischaemic attack or TIA)

Need to declare? Yes. Along with reporting the mini-stroke, you will need to stop driving for at least one month and only start again when told it’s are to do so by a doctor. Download ‘Car or motorcycle drivers who have had a stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA)

How to declare:  Choose to report your mini-stroke online here or using the STR1 form that can be downloaded here.


Condition: Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)

Need to declare? If your condition can impact on your driving, then yes, you will need to report it to the DVLA. Consult with your doctor for more information.

How to declare:  Use the M1V form to report your OCD here.


Condition: Pacemaker

Need to declare? Unlike many heart-related conditions, you will be required to inform the DVLA if you have a pacemaker fitted.

How to declare:  You can use this online form to report you have a pacemaker fitted, or use this downloadable form.


Condition: Sight in one eye only

Need to declare? If you’re able to meet the standards of vision for driving, you won’t need to report your condition. However, if you have a health condition in your functioning eye, you will need to check to see if the condition needs reporting here. Ask your GP if you are not sure about your condition.

How to declare:  N/A


Condition: Sleepiness

Need to declare? We can all feel tired while driving and this is a sign to pull over and have a break, but this is not a reason to contact the DVLA. However, excessive daytime sleepiness needs to be reported to the DVLA if it is the result of a medical condition. Speak to your doctor for more details.

How to declare:  Download SL1 here.


Condition: Spinal conditions, injuries or spinal surgery

Need to declare? Yes – you must report spinal conditions or injuries to the DVLA. Drivers who’ve had spinal surgery should check with their doctor before getting behind the wheel.

How to declare:  Find form G1 here


Condition: Stroke

Need to declare? You only need to tell the DVLA if you’re still having problems one month after the stroke. Download ‘Car or motorcycle drivers who have had a stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA)

How to declare:  Choose to report your mini-stroke online here or using the STR1 form that can be downloaded here.


Condition: Tachycardia

Need to declare? Yes. You must report this condition to the DVLA.

How to declare:  Use form H1 here.


BEAT THE HOLIDAY BUGS WITH OUR ESSENTIAL HEALTH GUIDE

What happens after you tell DVLA

You’ll usually get a decision about your licence within six weeks. If the decision-making process is going to take longer, you will get a letter to tell you so.

While deciding your case, the DVLA might:

Contact your doctor or consultant

Arrange for you to be examined

Ask you to take a driving assessment, or an eyesight or driving test.

It is likely that you’ll be able to keep driving while you await the decision. However, this will not always be the case and you should stop if you are worried that you’re not safe to drive.

What can happen

The DVLA will decide if….

You need to get a new driving licence

You can have a shorter licence – for 1, 2, 3 or 5 years

You need to adapt your car by fitting special controls

You must stop driving and give up your licence

You need to adapt your vehicle

You must stop driving and be told when you can reapply for your licence